serving the human molecule

Author Archives: Nicholas Markette

Happy 4th of July!

Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and in this, I…

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Memorial Day: Gratitude, Humility and Celebration

Gratitude is oft the most fleeting of all human emotions, but on this Memorial Day Weekend, the country sets aside a day to remember. Springing from a tradition after the Civil War, Americans have a 100+ year tradition of humbly celebrating those patriots that gave their lives for this country. In the 1860s, decorating the…

Structures, Outcomes, Term Limits

I had a fascinating discussion with a smart friend of mine—a professor of women and gender studies—where we discussed the plight of the U.S. economic and political system. My perspective was that the rules set by our government have distorted the economics that make capitalism a productive system. My perception of her argument was that…

Merry Christmas from Gavriel’s Horn

Since 2011, Gavriels-Horn has published many blogs from many authors. However, the “Merry Christmas” post generated the most feedback ever. So here is re-visit of this post. By the way, when did “Happy Holidays” replace the now controversial “Merry Christmas”? Consider two stories. In this past week, a group of young carolers were chased—not politely…

Thinking About Thinking

In recent research (Shraiky, Markette & Markette, in press), we explored what working graduate students valued most from their graduate education. Consistently, successful graduates from diverse masters programs ranging from design, business, nursing, and education noted that critical thinking was the most valuable benefit of graduate school. It gave us reason to ponder why haven’t…

A Simple Lesson from Immigration Applied to Corporate Tax Inversions

Regardless of the perspective, one lesson is clear from the immigration issue facing the country—people long to live and work in the United States of America. The U.S. remains attractive to millions seeking a better way of life. Despite this lesson from immigration, many in government appear to have missed the point when it comes…

Sport is Not War

(Photo: 18 year-old college-bound soccer players leading a cheer with 7 & 8 year-olds) Battle. Big guns. War. Often, we here words like these describe a sporting event and its competitors. Of course, advertisers spend big marketing bucks on media coverage of games likening competition to some war-like, angry confrontation. For many, this characterization is…

FIFA World Cup 2014; Discover The Beautiful Game

Seven hundred million viewers. Seventeen million American participants. The Super Bowl? American football? Nope. The World Series and baseball, perhaps? No, again. If you suggested The World Cup and soccer, then you guessed correctly. Soccer, the world’s favorite sport, has quietly emerged as one of the most popular sports in America over the past 30…

Got Arithmophobia?

Many people fear math or suffer from arithmophobia; one of my artist friends refers to math as a “dark art.” A group of clever doctoral students created an answer—StudyGeek.org . This free site includes lessons, games, and free math solvers. StudyGeek.org takes a fun approach to math. The site has an easy-to-digest tone making concepts…

Five Great Books for under $15

Looking for a good read to challenge or refresh your thinking? Here are five classics (or at least favorites) that range from simple to soulful. For less than $15, you can add all of these to your bookshelf—or tablet for you Millennials. The One Minute Manager (Blanchard & Johnson, 1982). This may be the first…